How to grab some fast-casual snacks with your favorite rapid food brands

Quick-service snack companies have come under fire recently over their use of the phrase “rap snacks” in their marketing materials.

The word “rap” is a slang term for food products with a higher fat content than other foods.

It has become an unofficial term for fast-food foods, which are typically served with a high-fat-content product.

The word has become popular in the fast-moving world of fast food and fast-fashion chains, where fast food is marketed in terms of convenience, convenience, quickness, ease of preparation, and quality.

Fast-food companies also use “rap food” in advertising.

Rap snacks, which were invented by fast- food chains like Chipotle and Pizza Hut, typically contain a mixture of ground beef, vegetables, and sauces.

These snacks are typically loaded with fast food ingredients like chicken, turkey, and other meats.

While some companies have apologized for using the phrase, other fast-service food companies have not.

In March, a federal appeals court ruled that Taco Bell, Wendy’s, and Dunkin Donuts are not liable for using “rap foods” in advertisements.

The court also ruled that Burger King has not used the phrase in advertising and does not have to change it.

The company’s spokesperson, Brian Smith, told the Washington Post in March that the company was “very disappointed” in the court’s ruling.

A lawsuit filed by the Center for Media Justice, a consumer advocacy group, accused Taco Bell and Wendy’s of using the term “rap snack” in a misleading way, and called for the food company to “cease and desist” from using it in advertising, and to remove the use of “rap”-based terms from its marketing materials and packaging.

Fast-casually food companies, like Burger King, have been quick to apologize for using it.

In a statement to The Huffington Post, Burger King said, “we do not use the term ‘rap snack’ in our marketing materials, and we are very disappointed with the court ruling that found this to be the case.

We will comply with the ruling and will issue an apology.”

The fast-fast food companies did not respond to requests for comment from HuffPost.

A representative for Taco Bell told HuffPost, “We have never been in the business of using slang terms to describe foods that are not ‘rap.’

We always think about the food and what we’re serving first and foremost, and this is a common refrain in our restaurants.”

The spokesperson said that the fast food chain has “a long history of using creative language to market our foods, and have done so since our inception.

We have been careful not to use the word ‘rap’ in any of our marketing, and for many years, we have used the word responsibly.”

A spokesperson for Wendy’s told HuffPost that “we believe the word is not an intentional term and we’re happy to have it removed.”

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